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How to Dye Eggs with Beets

There’s no reason to use chemically colored Easter egg dyes when coloring eggs with your kids this year! That’s because there are a variety of natural ways to add color to your eggshells without the need for food coloring or chemical tablets at all. To add a natural pink tone to your eggs this year, why not dye eggs with beets? It’s a fun and healthy way to decorate eggs for Easter.

There’s no reason to use chemically colored Easter egg dyes when coloring eggs with your kids this year! That’s because there are a variety of natural ways to add color to your eggshells without the need for food coloring or chemical tablets at all. To add a natural pink tone to your eggs this year, why not dye eggs with beets? It’s a fun and healthy way to decorate eggs for Easter.

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What Do I Need to Dye Eggs with Beets?

It’s easy to avoid chemical food dyes during the Easter season with the help of natural ingredients. When you use beets, you can give your eggs a beautiful pink tint with no food coloring required! To use this natural egg-dying method, you’ll need just a few simple supplies, including:

Overhead view of items needed to dye eggs with beets.

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How Do I Dye Eggs with Beets?

This homemade egg-dying method is a great way to add a pretty pink tint to your Easter eggs while you’re decorating them with your family this year. Follow these quick and easy instructions for using beets to dye your eggs.

Step One: Boil the Beets

Chop the beets into large chunks and add them to a pot with water. Bring the water to a boil and continue cooking the beets for around 30 minutes until the beets are tender and the water is tinted.

Step Two: Prepare the Dye

When the beets are cooked, strain the liquid into a bowl and set the beets aside. Stir the vinegar into the tinted water.

Step Three: Dye the Eggs

Place the eggs in the liquid, making sure they’re completely covered by the water. Allow the eggs to soak until the desired shade of pink has been reached, which typically takes up to 8 hours.

Overhead view of hard-boiled eggs in beet juices.

Step Four: Allow the Eggs to Dry

When you’re satisfied with the color of your Easter eggs, remove the foam from the top of the bowl and discard it. Afterward, you can carefully remove the eggs from the beet water and transfer them to a paper towel to air dry.

Eggs in a basket that have been dyed naturally with beet liquid.

Beet Easter Egg Dying Tips

With this natural egg-dying method, you don’t have to worry about decorating your hard-boiled eggs with unwanted chemicals. And you’re going to love how easy it is to do – especially with these helpful tips and tricks!

Make sure to scrub and trim the beets

Since the beets will be used to tint your water, it’s essential that they start off clean. Use a soft-bristled brush to scrub away all the dirt and debris from around the outside of the beets. Then trim off the excess pieces. You can also take the preparation method even further and peel the beets before adding them to the pot so that the brightly colored flesh is exposed on all sides of each piece.

Let the eggs soak in the fridge

Since natural egg dye often takes a long time to tint the shells of your eggs, you may be worried that your cooked eggs will go bad if they sit at room temperature while they’re being dyed. If you plan on allowing the eggs to soak for the entire 8 hours or more, all you have to do is place the bowl with the beet water and eggs in the refrigerator. The cold air in the fridge won’t affect the dying process.

Beet dyed Easter eggs on a tray.

Carefully rinse off the foam

The beet water may foam up as the eggs soak, which is entirely normal. But you may notice that the foam sticks to the eggs after they’re removed from the water. If that’s the case, carefully pour a gentle stream of water over the top of your eggs to knock off the bubbles.

Avoid wiping the eggs as they dry.

When you remove the eggs from the beet dye, it’s a good idea to let them air dry. Attempting to wipe the excess liquid off the eggs may cause the dye to rub off the shell.

Rotate the eggs as they dry. To ensure all your eggs dry evenly, try rotating the eggs every few hours, so the air hits all sides of the shell. You may need to replace the paper towels with clean ones as you rotate to ensure the eggs dry completely.

Use the beets in your favorite recipe.

There’s no reason to let those beets go to waste after you’re finished boiling them! Instead of tossing them, try adding them to your favorite beet recipe to ensure all the ingredients in your natural egg dye don’t go unused.

Do Beets Affect the Flavor of the Hard Boiled Eggs?

Since using beets to dye your eggs is a natural process, these hard-boiled eggs are perfectly safe to eat after you finish dying them. But since beets have a very distinct flavor, you might be worried that the taste will seep into your eggs while they soak. The good news is that as long as the shells are intact, there’s no reason that the flavor of the beets will affect the flavor of your eggs.

How to Dye Eggs with Beets

There’s no reason to use chemically colored Easter egg dyes when coloring eggs with your kids this year! That’s because there are a variety of natural ways to add color to your eggshells without the need for food coloring or chemical tablets at all. To add a natural pink tone to your eggs this year, why not dye eggs with beets? It’s a fun and healthy way to decorate eggs for Easter.
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Ingredients

Instructions

  • Add the beets and water to a boiling pot and let simmer for about 30 minutes.
  • Strain the liquid and stir in the vinegar. Use the beet chunks for a side dish or compost.
  • Add your eggs to the liquid, making sure they’re completely covered by the beet dye.
  • Leave to dye until the desired shade of color is reached. I left them for about 8 hours.
  • Remove the foam from the top of the bowl or dish you used to dye the eggs and discard it.
  • Gently remove the eggs from the dye bowl and place them on paper towels to dry. If they have some stringy or foamy substance stuck to them, use a cup of water and let a gentle stream run over it to remove some of it. Have fun!

Notes

  • Make sure to scrub and trim the beets. Since the beets will be used to tint your water, it’s essential that they start off clean. Use a soft bristled brush to scrub away all the dirt and debris from around the outside of the beets. Then trim off the excess pieces. You can also take the preparation method even further and peel the beets before adding them to the pot so that the brightly colored flesh is exposed on all sides of each piece.
  • Let the eggs soak in the fridge. Since natural egg dye often takes a long time to tint the shells of your eggs, you may be worried that your cooked eggs will go bad if they sit at room temperature while they’re being dyed. If you plan on allowing the eggs to soak for the full 8 hours or more, all you have to do is place the bowl with the beet water and eggs in the refrigerator. The cold air in the fridge won’t affect they dying process.
  • Carefully rinse off the foam. The beet water may foam up as the eggs soak, which is completely normal. But you may notice that the foam sticks to the eggs after they’re removed from the water. If that’s the case, carefully pour a gently stream of water over the top of your eggs to knock off the bubbles.
  • Avoid wiping the eggs as they dry. When you remove the eggs from the beet dye, it’s a good idea to let them air dry. Attempting to wipe the excess liquid off the eggs may cause the dye to rub off the shell.
  • Rotate the eggs as they dry. To ensure all your eggs dry evenly, try rotating the eggs every few hours so the air hits all sides of the shell. You may need to replace the paper towels with clean ones as you rotate to ensure that the eggs dry completely.
  • Use the beets in your favorite recipe. There’s no reason to let those beets go to waste after you’re finished boiling them! Instead of tossing them, try adding them to your favorite beet recipe to ensure all the ingredients in your natural egg dye don’t go unused.
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